Tag Archives: triptych

Teenkahon (Three Obsessions) Screening & Discussion with Bauddhayan Mukherji

3_kahon_Mosaic

DCIFF presents a screening of Teenkahon (Three Obsessions) followed by a Q&A with producer-director Bauddhayan Mukherji on Saturday, February 28th at 5:15pm. Tickets can be purchased in advance or at the door.

Teenkahon is a rare international triptych film directed by one of India’s leading advertising filmmakers, Bauddhayan Mukherji. The three stories that make up this film capture the changing face of morality, degeneration of values and the changing social fabric of Bengal. Teenkahon has been Mukherji’s tribute to Satyajit Ray, the one man who unknowingly changed his life for the best. Mukherji says, “he is the reason why I make films, hence the first story is dedicated to him. If it does remind people of Ray, I would take it as a complement.”

Teenkahon Film Still 5*    Teenkahon Film Still 4*

Three stories, spanning one hundred years, are structured in the manner of a classical three-act play. The first film, Nabalok, represents the time period 1920-1954 and is shot in black and white. Post Mortem is a technicolor film set in 1978. The third act is titled Telephone, and it depicts 2013 in contemporary digital film format. Teenkahon is an ambitious movie that links each story through the theme of obsessive relationships outside of marriage. As a director, Mukherji says he has, “aimed to document social evolution in Bengal and at the same time celebrate each period in all its glory through this film.”

Buddy's headshot 3

At age eleven, Mukherji decided to become a filmmaker after ready a book by Satyajit Ray titled Ekei Boley Shooting (All About Shooting). Today he runs his own production company called Little Lamb Films and is considered a trailblazer in Indian advertising, having won numerous international awards for his commercials. Although he thrives in the commercial ad space, Mukherji’s heart lies with Bengali feature films.

Mukherji sees Teenkahon as his tribute to a hundred years of Indian filmmaking. He tells us, “If people find the dualism and dichotomy that exist in this journey of two hours interesting, I would possibly feel elated as a filmmaker.”

Learn more about Teenkahon on the DCIFF website.

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